Coasting Along

I had my quarterly A1C appointment this morning. I didn’t have very high expectations for it. Truth be told, I haven’t been doing much in the way of proactively managing my diabetes. I don’t log my blood sugars and I haven’t worn my Dexcom CGM in weeks, which means I’ve done very little in the way of making changes.

The reason I stopped wearing a Dexcom is because I noticed that the accuracy was starting to falter and I was irritated with all the false alarms. It was weeks before I decided to put another sensor in, and when I did, I noticed that all the CGMs I had were expired. But I still didn’t call and order new supplies because… it’s expensive? Alarms suck? I didn’t want to? All of those are probably correct.

When my endo came in and asked me what I thought my A1C was, I said, “Probably the same as last time.” I didn’t think it had gotten any worse, but it would have been a miracle if it was more than a couple tenths of a point lower. My endo looked up my last A1C and lo and behold, yep! My A1C is exactly the same as it was just a few months ago.

The good news is that I have managed to stay pretty stable, but the bad news is that my A1C isn’t really that great. I need to get back into action.

Between now and my next appointment, I feel like I need to bring my A-game back. A few months of just coasting along has been, well, relaxing as it can be in living with diabetes, but it’s not getting me where I want to go. A few things I want to change:

  1. Wearing my Dexcom and downloading the data at least bi-weekly.
  2. Trying to eat more low-carb, both for blood sugars and weight loss.
  3. Exercise even more consistently — shouldn’t be too hard since I’m training for a marathon.

The main thing with eating more low-carb is because while I lost 15 pounds on Victoza, my weight seems to have plateaued. It’s helped decrease my appetite and increase my insulin sensitivity but I still have a lot farther that I want to go. Working on my diet seems like the most logical place to go, because, well, that’s the area that I need the most work!

But most importantly, I just need to be a more active participant in my diabetes management. I need to pay attention to numbers, ratios, calories and carbs. The issues that pop up in diabetes aren’t going to resolve themselves, no matter how many times I tell myself that maybe it’ll be different tomorrow.

So that’s the latest news on the D-front. I’m getting ready to leave for Oregon on Friday for a friend’s wedding, visit my parents and — wait for it — TURN THIRTY.

When I started my first diabetes blog, I was about to turn 20 years old, so yes, I’m feeling terribly old right now. Where does the time go?!

Support JDRF at the Great River Ragnar Relay!

jdrf_team_logoTap, tap. 

Is this thing still on?

Hey there, folks. So it’s been a little over a month since my last post, which also happened to be a guest post so that almost doesn’t even count, does it? It wasn’t even about me.

Well in the last month, I’ve been swamped with school work. I’m finishing up my third semester of grad school, getting my Masters in Marriage and Family Therapy (in case you still thought I was going to school for dietetics, or heaven forbid, nursing — that was so 2012). At the end of July, I will officially be halfway through the program, although technically it may go a bit longer than next summer since the start date of my internship could be anywhere from January to September depending on where I get in, and then those programs can be anywhere from six to twelve months. But, uh, hopefully I’ll graduate someday.

In addition to that, I’ve been training for a couple of races, the Twin Cities Marathon — my first! — at the beginning of October and the Great River Ragnar Relay, which I mentioned awhile back.

The Great River Ragnar Relay is actually why I’m here blogging today. You see, since I’m running the relay on behalf of Team JDRF (we are the first JDRF team to run a Ragnar!), I have to do a bit of fundraising. JDRF is a charity near-and-dear to many of us. Children’s Congress is happening right now in Washington, D.C. and that was actually where I got my “start” in diabetes advocacy almost 15 years ago (I can hardly believe I just typed those words).

JDRF has been an amazing champion of not just the diabetes cure, but of also living a long and healthy life so that we’re actually around to see the cure when it happens. From smart insulin to the Artificial Pancreas, to islet encapsulation and much more, JDRF has supported so much ground-breaking work. But as you know, we have a long way to go. Plus, we also need to prevent diabetes from happening in the first place, and after the tragic events of last weekend with Kycie and David, I think everyone can agree with that.

So with that being said, I’m going to post the link to my fundraising page. I know we all have our own special interests in diabetes research, so if you don’t donate to JDRF via my page, I hope that you find another way to support the cause. Research can’t be done without funds, so I encourage you to do your homework and find something to support!

Thanks friends!